Articles | Volume 14, issue 2
Clim. Past, 14, 239–253, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-239-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 239–253, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-239-2018

Research article 02 Mar 2018

Research article | 02 Mar 2018

Response of the carbon cycle in an intermediate complexity model to the different climate configurations of the last nine interglacials

Nathaelle Bouttes et al.

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Status: closed
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Nov 2017) by Arne Winguth
AR by Nathaelle Bouttes on behalf of the Authors (16 Nov 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Dec 2017) by Arne Winguth
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Short summary
Atmospheric CO2 is key for climate change. CO2 is lower during the oldest warm period of the last million years, the interglacials, than during the most recent ones (since 430 000 years ago). This difference has not been explained yet, but could be due to changes of ocean circulation. We test this hypothesis and the role of vegetation and ice sheets using an intermediate complexity model. We show that only small changes of CO2 can be obtained, underlying missing feedbacks or mechanisms.