Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
Clim. Past, 14, 1625–1637, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-1625-2018
Clim. Past, 14, 1625–1637, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-14-1625-2018

Research article 05 Nov 2018

Research article | 05 Nov 2018

Burning-derived vanillic acid in an Arctic ice core from Tunu, northeastern Greenland

Mackenzie M. Grieman et al.

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Short summary
Vanillic acid is reported in the Tunu ice core from northeastern Greenland. It is an aerosol-borne acid produced by biomass burning. North American boreal forests are likely the source regions of the vanillic acid deposited at the ice core site. Vanillic acid levels were elevated during warm climate periods and lower during cooler climate periods. There is a positive correlation between the vanillic acid ice core record and ammonium and black carbon in the NEEM ice core from northern Greenland.