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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 9
Clim. Past, 13, 1285–1300, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-1285-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Clim. Past, 13, 1285–1300, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-13-1285-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 28 Sep 2017

Research article | 28 Sep 2017

Examining bias in pollen-based quantitative climate reconstructions induced by human impact on vegetation in China

Wei Ding et al.

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Short summary
Pollen-based past climate reconstruction for regions with long-term human occupation is always controversial. We examined the bias induced by the human impact on vegetation in a climate reconstruction for temperate eastern China by comparing the deviations in the reconstructed results for a fossil record based on two pollen–climate calibration sets. Climatic signals in pollen assemblages are indeed obscured by human impact; however, the extent of the bias could be assessed.
Pollen-based past climate reconstruction for regions with long-term human occupation is always...
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