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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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We analyze the vegetation and climate in northwestern Turkey during the last ca. 31 000 years based on a new pollen data set from lacustrine sediment cores. The study reveals vegetation responses to long-term and rapid climate changes. Moreover, it documents human activities in the catchment of Lake Iznik and shows a clear anthropogenic impact on the vegetation since the Early Bronze Age.
Articles | Volume 12, issue 2
Clim. Past, 12, 575–593, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-575-2016
Clim. Past, 12, 575–593, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-12-575-2016

Research article 01 Mar 2016

Research article | 01 Mar 2016

Impacts of climate and humans on the vegetation in northwestern Turkey: palynological insights from Lake Iznik since the Last Glacial

Andrea Miebach et al.

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Short summary
We analyze the vegetation and climate in northwestern Turkey during the last ca. 31 000 years based on a new pollen data set from lacustrine sediment cores. The study reveals vegetation responses to long-term and rapid climate changes. Moreover, it documents human activities in the catchment of Lake Iznik and shows a clear anthropogenic impact on the vegetation since the Early Bronze Age.
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