Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2024-7
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2024-7
26 Feb 2024
 | 26 Feb 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

Two severe famines (1809–1810, 1814–1814) in Korea during the last stage of the little ice age (1809–1819)

Sung Woo Kim

Abstract. From the eruption of an unknown volcano in 1809 until that of Tambora in April 1815, large and small volcanoes erupted in succession, causing various climatic changes around the Earth. During this period, the monsoon climate zone of East Asia, including Korea, had a very dry summer, and the rice yield was very poor, which resulted in two severe famines that lasted until early summer in the following years. During the famines in 1809–1810 and 1814–1815, about 24 percent of the population of Korea (approx. 14 million people) died. The severity of the drought varied widely depending on the region in Korea. Famine was more severe in the southern region, due to the higher degree of drought than in the northern region that suffered less of a drought and reported a fewer number of deaths. Based on the works of a Korean bureaucrat-scholar, Chŏng Yak-yong, this article shed lights on the famines in Chŏlla-do Province, caused by the droughts in the last stages of the “little ice age” (1809–1819).

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Sung Woo Kim

Status: open (until 29 Jun 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2024-7', Anonymous Referee #1, 18 Apr 2024 reply
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Sung woo Kim, 28 Apr 2024 reply
Sung Woo Kim
Sung Woo Kim

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Short summary
From the eruption of an unknown volcano in 1809 until that of Tambora in April 1815, large and small volcanoes erupted in succession, causing various climatic changes around the Earth. During this period, the monsoon climate zone of East Asia, including Korea, had a very dry summer, and the rice yield was very poor, which resulted in two severe famines that lasted until early summer in the following years.