Articles | Volume 7, issue 3
Clim. Past, 7, 935–940, 2011
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-7-935-2011
Clim. Past, 7, 935–940, 2011
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-7-935-2011

Research article 25 Aug 2011

Research article | 25 Aug 2011

Impact of North Atlantic – GIN Sea exchange on deglaciation evolution of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

J. Cheng1, Z. Liu2,3, F. He2, B. L. Otto-Bliesner4, and C. Colose2,5 J. Cheng et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education and College of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, 210044, China
  • 2Center for Climatic Research and Dept. Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI53706, USA
  • 3Laboratory for Climate and Ocean-Atmosphere Studies, Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, School of Physics, Peking University, 100871, Beijing, China
  • 4Climate and Global Dynamics Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, USA
  • 5Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA

Abstract. In a transient simulation of the last deglaciation with a fully coupled model (TraCE-21000), an overshoot of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is simulated and proposed as a key factor for the onset of the Bølling-Allerød (BA) warming event. There is collaborating evidence for an AMOC overshoot at the BA in various proxy reconstructions although the mechanism governing its behavior is not well understood. Here, we present two new sensitivity experiments to explicitly illustrate the impact of North Atlantic – GIN Sea exchange on the AMOC's deglacial evolution. Results show that this oceanic exchange dominates the convection restarting in the GIN Sea, the occurrence of the AMOC overshoot, and the full BA warming.

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