Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2024-44
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2024-44
19 Jun 2024
 | 19 Jun 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

The Indo-Pacific Pollen Database – a Neotoma constituent database

Annika V. Herbert, Simon G. Haberle, Suzette G. A. Flantua, Ondrej Mottl, Jessica L. Blois, John W. Williams, Adrian George, and Geoff S. Hope

Abstract. The Indo-Pacific Pollen Database (IPPD) is the brainchild of the late Professor Geoffrey Hope, who gathered pollen records from across the region to ensure their preservation for future generations of palaeoecologists. This noble aim is now being fulfilled by integrating the IPPD into the online Neotoma Palaeoecology Database, making this compilation available for public use. Here we explore the database in depth and suggest directions for future research. The IPPD comprises 226 fossil pollen records, most postdating 20 ka, but some extending as far back as 50 ka or further. Over 80 % of the records are Australian, with a fairly even distribution between the different Australian geographical regions, the notable exception being Western Australia, which is only represented by 3 records. The records are also well distributed in modern climate space, the largest gap being in drier regions due to preservation issues. However, many of the records contain few samples or have fewer than 5 chronology control points, such as radiocarbon, luminescence or Pb-210 for the younger sequences. Average sedimentation rate for the whole database, counted as years per cm, is 64.8 yr/cm, with 61 % of the records having a rate of less than 50 yr/cm. The highest sedimentation rate by geographical region occurs on Australia’s east coast, while the lowest rates are from the Western Pacific. Overall, Australia has a higher sedimentation rate than the rest of the Indo-Pacific region. The IPPD offers many exciting research opportunities, such as examination of human impact on regional vegetation, contrasting first human arrival and colonisation, and assessment of rates of vegetation change during the Holocene. Merging the IPPD into Neotoma also facilitates inclusion of data from the Indo-Pacific region into global syntheses.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Annika V. Herbert, Simon G. Haberle, Suzette G. A. Flantua, Ondrej Mottl, Jessica L. Blois, John W. Williams, Adrian George, and Geoff S. Hope

Status: open (until 14 Aug 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2024-44', Anonymous Referee #1, 29 Jun 2024 reply
Annika V. Herbert, Simon G. Haberle, Suzette G. A. Flantua, Ondrej Mottl, Jessica L. Blois, John W. Williams, Adrian George, and Geoff S. Hope

Model code and software

IPPD Github repo Ondrej Mottl https://github.com/HOPE-UIB-BIO/IPPD_overview

Annika V. Herbert, Simon G. Haberle, Suzette G. A. Flantua, Ondrej Mottl, Jessica L. Blois, John W. Williams, Adrian George, and Geoff S. Hope

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Short summary
The Indo-Pacific Pollen database is a large collection of pollen samples from across the Indo-Pacific region, with most samples coming from Australia. This is a valuable collection that can be used to analyse vegetation dynamics going back thousands of years. It is now being fully shared via Neotoma for the first time, opening up many exciting new avenues of research. This paper presents key aspects of this database, including geographical distribution, age control and sedimentation rates.