Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2023-73
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2023-73
16 Oct 2023
 | 16 Oct 2023
Status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

North Atlantic Oscillation polarity during the past 3 ka derived from lacustrine sediments of large lowland lake Schweriner See, NE-Germany

Marie-Luise Adolph, Sambor Czerwinski, Mirko Dreßler, Paul Strobel, Marcel Bliedtner, Sebastian Lorenz, Maxime Debret, and Torsten Haberzettl

Abstract. Based on a multi-dating and multi-proxy approach, we reconstruct Late Holocene environmental changes from sediments of Schweriner See, a large lowland lake in NE-Germany spanning the past 3070+170/-210 cal BP. We infer large-scale atmospheric variations using a combination of in-lake productivity indicators using traditional and high-resolution techniques (e.g. LOI550, TOC, inc/coh), diatom assemblages, which are sensitive to ice-cover duration, as well as compound-specific hydrogen isotopes (δ2HC25) reflecting variability in the moisture source region distinguishing the southern and northern North Atlantic and/or Arctic region and/or the degree of evaporative lake water enrichment. Our study shows that before 1850 CE, in-lake productivity at Schweriner See was mainly influenced by winter temperature variability, which modulates ice-cover duration and growing-season length. Low productivity co-occurs with the occurrence of the diatom species Stephanocostis chantaicus, which blooms below the ice cover, indicating temporal prolonged ice cover duration. Simultaneously, changes to a moisture source region in the northern North Atlantic and/or Arctic regions and/or low evaporative lake water enrichment are inferred from δ2HC25. In contrast, high productivity is linked to the disappearance of S. chantaicus and moisture originating from the southern North Atlantic and/or high evaporative lake water enrichment. These distinct changes are driven by variations between positive and negative NAO polarity during the past 3070+170/-210 cal BP. Besides these long-term shifts in atmospheric conditions, short-term variations can be inferred from titanium concentrations, which mainly reflect paleo-shoreline distance likely linked to precipitation variability and, after the 12th century, to anthropogenic impacts. Since 1850 CE, productivity has been driven by nutrient availability.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Marie-Luise Adolph, Sambor Czerwinski, Mirko Dreßler, Paul Strobel, Marcel Bliedtner, Sebastian Lorenz, Maxime Debret, and Torsten Haberzettl

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2023-73', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 Nov 2023
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Marie-Luise Adolph, 21 Dec 2023
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2023-73', Anonymous Referee #2, 09 Nov 2023
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Marie-Luise Adolph, 21 Dec 2023
Marie-Luise Adolph, Sambor Czerwinski, Mirko Dreßler, Paul Strobel, Marcel Bliedtner, Sebastian Lorenz, Maxime Debret, and Torsten Haberzettl
Marie-Luise Adolph, Sambor Czerwinski, Mirko Dreßler, Paul Strobel, Marcel Bliedtner, Sebastian Lorenz, Maxime Debret, and Torsten Haberzettl

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Short summary
We studied large-scale atmospheric conditions and lake-level variations using lake sediments from Schweriner See, NE-Germany. For the past 3000 years, our results suggest large-scale variability in the North Atlantic Oscillation, which is one of the main drivers of climate in the North Atlantic region, affecting, for example, winter temperature and precipitation. Lake-level variability is linked to precipitation changes and after the 12th century to anthropogenic impacts.