Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2023-100
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2023-100
15 Dec 2023
 | 15 Dec 2023
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

Carbonyl sulfide measurements from a South Pole ice core and implications for atmospheric variability since the last glacial period

Murat Aydin, Melinda R. Nicewonger, Gregory L. Britten, Dominic Winski, Mary Whelan, John D. Patterson, Erich Osterberg, Christopher F. Lee, Tara Harder, Kyle J. Callahan, David Ferris, and Eric S. Saltzman

Abstract. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere with links to terrestrial and oceanic productivity. We measured COS in ice core air from an intermediate depth ice core from the South Pole using both dry and wet extraction methods, recovering a 52,500-year record. We find evidence for COS production in the firn, altering the atmospheric signal preserved in the ice core. Mean sea salt aerosol concentrations from the same depth are a good proxy for the COS production, which disproportionately impacts the measurements from glacial ice with high sea salt aerosol concentrations. The COS measurements are corrected using sea salt sodium (ssNa) as a proxy for the excess COS resulting from the production. The ssNa-corrected COS record displays substantially less COS in the glacial atmosphere than the Holocene and a 2–4 fold COS rise during the deglaciation synchronous with the associated climate signal. The deglacial COS rise was primarily source driven. Oceanic emissions in the form of COS, carbon disulfide (CS2), and dimethylsulfide (DMS) are collectively the largest natural source of atmospheric COS. A large increase in ocean COS emissions during the deglaciation suggests enhancements in emissions of all three sulfur gases via processes that involve ocean productivity.

Murat Aydin, Melinda R. Nicewonger, Gregory L. Britten, Dominic Winski, Mary Whelan, John D. Patterson, Erich Osterberg, Christopher F. Lee, Tara Harder, Kyle J. Callahan, David Ferris, and Eric S. Saltzman

Status: open (until 23 Feb 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on Aydin et al. (2023) CP Discussion (cp-2023-100)', Wu Sun, 26 Jan 2024 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2023-100', Anonymous Referee #2, 17 Feb 2024 reply
Murat Aydin, Melinda R. Nicewonger, Gregory L. Britten, Dominic Winski, Mary Whelan, John D. Patterson, Erich Osterberg, Christopher F. Lee, Tara Harder, Kyle J. Callahan, David Ferris, and Eric S. Saltzman
Murat Aydin, Melinda R. Nicewonger, Gregory L. Britten, Dominic Winski, Mary Whelan, John D. Patterson, Erich Osterberg, Christopher F. Lee, Tara Harder, Kyle J. Callahan, David Ferris, and Eric S. Saltzman

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Short summary
We present a new ice core COS record from the South Pole, Antarctica, yielding a 52,000-year atmospheric record after correction for production in the ice sheet. The results display a large increase in atmospheric COS concurrent with the last deglaciation. The deglacial COS rise results from an overall strengthening of atmospheric COS sources, implying a large increase in ocean sulfur gas emissions. Atmospheric sulfur gases have negative climate feedbacks.