Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-97
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-97

  28 Jul 2021

28 Jul 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

Reorganization of Atlantic waters at sub-polar latitudes linked to deep water overflow in both glacial and interglacial climate states

Dakota Evan Holmes1,2, Tali Lea Babila3, Ulysses Ninnemann4, Gordon Bromley1,2, Shane Tyrrell6,7, Greig A. Paterson5, Michelle Judith Curran1,2, and Audrey Morley1,2,7 Dakota Evan Holmes et al.
  • 1Department of Geography, School of Geography, Archaeology and Irish Studies, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland
  • 2Ryan Institute for Environmental, Marine, and Energy Research, Galway, Ireland
  • 3Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom
  • 4Department of Earth Science and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
  • 5Department of Earth, Ocean, and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
  • 6Earth and Ocean Sciences, School of Natural Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland
  • 7iCRAG Irish Centre for Research in Applied Geosciences, Ireland

Abstract. Abrupt climate events are generally attributed as a characteristic of glacial (intermediate-to-large cryosphere) climate states. While a large cryosphere may be a necessary boundary condition for millennial-scale events to persist, it remains unclear whether high-magnitude climate variability is purely a glacial phenomenon requiring cryosphere-driven feedbacks. High-resolution climate records are used to portray North Atlantic climate's progression through low-ice, interglacial boundary conditions of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11c into the glacial inception. We show that this period is marked by rapid shifts in both deep overflow and surface climate. The reorganization between polar and Atlantic waters at subpolar latitudes appears to accompany changes in the flow of deep water emanating from the Nordic Seas, regardless of magnitude or boundary conditions. Further, during both glacial and interglacial boundary conditions, we find that a reduction in deep water precedes surface hydrographic change. The existence of surface and deep ocean events during an interglacial, with similar magnitudes, abruptness, and surface-deep phasing as their glacial counterparts, alters our concept of “warm” climate stability and the requisite cryospheric thresholds and feedbacks for it.

Dakota Evan Holmes et al.

Status: open (until 22 Sep 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-97', Christoph Nehrbass-Ahles, 24 Aug 2021 reply
    • AC1: 'Reply on CC1', Audrey Morley, 31 Aug 2021 reply
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-97', Ian Candy, 29 Aug 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-97', Anonymous Referee #2, 30 Aug 2021 reply
  • RC3: 'Comment on cp-2021-97', Anonymous Referee #3, 06 Sep 2021 reply

Dakota Evan Holmes et al.

Dakota Evan Holmes et al.

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Short summary
Here, we present new evidence that high magnitude climate changes are possible without large continental ice sheets altering atmospheric circulation or releasing stored buoyancy capacitance. Based on our proxy-based observations of abrupt high-magnitude climate events that occurred during low-ice, interglacial boundary conditions we hypothesize that North Atlantic Deep-Water production, is considerably more susceptible to the redistribution of Atlantic Waters than previously thought.