Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-82
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-82

  29 Jul 2021

29 Jul 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

The 1600 Huaynaputina Eruption as Possible Trigger for Persistent Cooling in the North Atlantic Region

Sam White1, Eduardo Moreno-Chamarro2, Davide Zanchettin3, Heli Huhtamaa4,5, Dagomar Degroot6, Markus Stoffel7,8,9, and Christophe Corona7,10 Sam White et al.
  • 1Department of History, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, United States
  • 2Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona, Spain
  • 3Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca’ Foscari of Venice, Mestre, 30172, Italy
  • 4Institute of History, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
  • 5Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
  • 6Department of History, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 3700, United States
  • 7Climatic Change Impacts and Risks in the Anthropocene (C-CIA), Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, 1205, Switzerland
  • 8Department for Earth Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, 1205, Switzerland
  • 9Department F.-A. Forel for Aquatic and Environmental Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, 1205, Switzerland
  • 10CNRS, Geolab, University of Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, 63000, France

Abstract. Paleoclimate reconstructions identify a period of exceptional summer and winter cooling in the North Atlantic region following the eruption of the tropical volcano Huaynaputina (Peru) in 1600 CE. Numerical climate simulations indicate a possible eruption-induced mechanism for the persistent cooling in a slowdown of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (SPG) and consequent ocean-atmosphere feedbacks. To examine the possibility of such an eruption-induced cooling mechanism, this study compares simulations with and without volcanic forcing and an SPG shift to reconstructions from annual proxies in natural archives and historical written records as well as contemporary historical observations of relevant climate and environmental conditions. These reconstructions and observations demonstrate patterns of cooling and sea ice expansion consistent with, but not necessarily indicative of, an eruption trigger for the proposed SPG slowdown mechanism. The results point to possible improvements in future model-data comparison studies utilizing historical written records. Moreover, we consider historical societal impacts and adaptations associated with the reconstructed climatic and environmental anomalies.

Sam White et al.

Status: open (until 23 Sep 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-82', Christian Pfister, 23 Aug 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-82', R. Stockton Maxwell, 27 Aug 2021 reply
  • RC3: 'Comment on cp-2021-82', Anonymous Referee #3, 29 Aug 2021 reply
  • RC4: 'Comment on cp-2021-82', Anonymous Referee #4, 14 Sep 2021 reply
  • RC5: 'Comment on cp-2021-82', Milos Rydval, 16 Sep 2021 reply

Sam White et al.

Sam White et al.

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Short summary
This study examines whether the Huaynaputina volcano eruption in 1600 triggered persistent cooling the North Atlantic region by comparing paleoclimate simulations and climate reconstructions from natural proxies and historical written sources. It finds that the reconstructions are consistent with, but do not necessarily support, an eruption-triggered mechanism for persistent cooling. The study also considers the historical societal impacts of climatic change during this period.