Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-44
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-44

  03 May 2021

03 May 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

Dating of an East Antarctic ice core (GV7) by high resolution chemical stratigraphies

Raffaello Nardin1, Mirko Severi1,2, Alessandra Amore1, Silvia Becagli1,2, Francois Burgay3,4, Laura Caiazzo5, Virginia Ciardini6, Giuliano Dreossi2,3, Massimo Frezzotti7, Sang-Bum Hong8, Ishaq Khan3, Bianca Maria Narcisi6, Marco Proposito6, Claudio Scarchilli6, Enricomaria Selmo9, Andrea Spolaor2,3, Barbara Stenni2,3, and Rita Traversi1,2 Raffaello Nardin et al.
  • 1Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, University of Florence, Florence, 50019, Italy
  • 2Institute of Polar Sciences of the National Research Council of Italy (ISP-CNR), 30172, Venice, Italy
  • 3Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics of the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Venice, 30172, Italy
  • 4Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry (LUC), Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • 5National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Florence, 50019, Italy
  • 6ENEA, Laboratory of Observations and Measures for the environment and climate, 00123 Rome, Italy
  • 7Department of Science, Geologic Sciences section, Roma 3 University, 00154 Rome, Italy
  • 8Division of Glacial Environmental Research, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon 21990, Korea
  • 9Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Parma, 43121, Italy

Abstract. Ice core dating is the first step for a correct interpretation of climatic and environmental changes. In this work, we release a stratigraphic dating of the uppermost 197 m of the 250 m deep GV7(B) ice core (drilling site, 70°41’S, 158°52’E, 1950 m a.s.l.) with a sub-annual resolution. Chemical stratigraphies of NO3, MSA (methanesulfonic acid), non-sea salt SO42−, sea-salt ions and the oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) were used in the annual layer counting upon the identification of a seasonal profile in their records. Different procedures were tested and thanks to the volcanic history of the core, obtained in previous works, an accurate age-depth correlation was obtained for the period 1179–2009 CE. Once the dating of the core was finalized, the annual mean accumulation rate was evaluated throughout the analyzed 197 m of the core, obtaining an annually resolved history of the snow accumulation on site in the last millennium. A small, yet consistent, rise in accumulation rate was found for the last 830 years since the middle of the 18th century.

Raffaello Nardin et al.

Status: open (until 28 Jun 2021)

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Raffaello Nardin et al.

Raffaello Nardin et al.

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Short summary
The first step to exploit all the potential information buried into ice cores is to produce a reliable age scale. Basing on chemical and isotopic stratigraphies from the 197 m long Antarctic GV7 ice core, an accurate dating was achieved showing that the archive spans roughly the last 830 years. The relatively high accumulation rate allowed using the non-sea salt-sulphate seasonal pattern for counting annual layers. Accumulation rate reconstruction exhibited a slight rise since 18th century.