Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-137
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-137

  22 Oct 2021

22 Oct 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

Humidity changes and possible forcing mechanisms over the last millennium in arid Central Asia

Shengnan Feng1, Xingqi Liu1, Feng Shi2,3,4, Xin Mao1,5, Yun Li6, and Jiaping Wang1 Shengnan Feng et al.
  • 1College of Resource, Environment and Tourism, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Cenozoic Geology and Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
  • 3Georges Lemaître Centre for Earth and Climate Research, Earth and Life Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348, Belgium
  • 4CAS Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Beijing 100044, China
  • 5Institute of Hydrogeology and Environmental Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Shijiazhuang 050061, China
  • 6Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008, China

Abstract. Hydroclimate changes have exerted a significant influence on the historical trajectory of ancient civilizations in arid Central Asia where the central routes of the Silk Road have been hosted. However, the climate changes at different time scales and their possible forcing mechanisms over the last millennium remain unclear due to low-resolution records. Here, we provide a continuous high-resolution humidity history in arid Central Asia over the past millennium based on the ~1.8-year high-resolution multiproxy records with good chronological control from Lake Dalongchi in the central Tianshan Mountains. Generally, the climate was dry during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and Current Warm Period (CWP), and wet during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which could be attributed to the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). Furthermore, we find that the humidity oscillation was dramatic and unstable at multidecadal to century-scale, especially within the LIA. The continuous wavelet analysis and wavelet coherence show that the humidity oscillation is modulated by the Gleissberg cycle at the century-scale and by the quasi-regular period of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) at the multidecadal scale. Our findings suggest that the effect of the solar cycle and the quasi-regular period of ENSO should be seriously evaluated for hydroclimate predictions and climate simulations in arid Central Asia in the future.

Shengnan Feng et al.

Status: open (until 17 Dec 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on cp-2021-137', Anonymous Referee #1, 31 Oct 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on cp-2021-137', Anonymous Referee #2, 19 Nov 2021 reply
  • RC3: 'Comment on cp-2021-137', Anonymous Referee #3, 19 Nov 2021 reply

Shengnan Feng et al.

Shengnan Feng et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 521 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
425 87 9 521 3 4
  • HTML: 425
  • PDF: 87
  • XML: 9
  • Total: 521
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 22 Oct 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 22 Oct 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 457 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 457 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 27 Nov 2021
Download
Short summary
We present a continuous humidity history in arid Central Asia over the past millennium based on the ~1.8-year high-resolution multiproxy record from Lake Dalongchi. Our findings emphasize that the Gleissberg solar cycle and quasi-regular period of ENSO amplitude play critical roles in controlling the effective humidity at century and multidecadal timescales, respectively. Our analysis provides new insights for hydroclimate predictions and climate simulations in arid Central Asia in the future.