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Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2020-93
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2020-93
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  10 Aug 2020

10 Aug 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

The response of annual minimum temperature on the eastern central Tibetan Plateau to large volcanic eruptions for the period 1380–2014 AD

Yajun Wang1, Xuemei Shao1,2, Yong Zhang1, and Mingqi Li1 Yajun Wang et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Land Surface Pattern and Simulation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, 100101, China
  • 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China

Abstract. Volcanic eruptions have a significant impact on global temperature; their consequences are of particular interest in regions that are especially sensitive to climate change, like the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we develop a temperature-sensitive tree-ring width standard chronology covering the period 1348–2014 AD using Qilian juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) samples collected from Animaqin Mountain on the Tibetan Plateau. We reconstruct the annual (prior August to current July) mean minimum temperature (Tmin) since 1380 AD and show that our reconstruction explains 58 % of the variance during the 1960–2014 calibration period. Our results demonstrate in 77.8 % of cases in which a volcanic eruption with a volcanic explosivity index of 5 or greater occurs, temperature decreases in the year of or the year following the eruption. The results of the Superposed Epoch Analysis also indicate that there is a high probability that the Tmin decreases within 2 years of a large volcanic eruption, especially when such eruptions occur in low latitudes.

Yajun Wang et al.

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Yajun Wang et al.

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Short summary
It is not necessarily clear to what extent or in what manner a strong volcanic eruption will influence temperature in different regions over the long-term. Therefore, a new 635-year long annual mean minimum temperatures (Tmin) across the east-central TP was used to explored the response of Tmin to strong volcanic eruptions. Our results show that there is a high probability that the Tmin decreases within 2 years of a large volcanic eruption, especially when such eruptions occur in low latitudes.
It is not necessarily clear to what extent or in what manner a strong volcanic eruption will...
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