Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 3.536
IF3.536
IF 5-year value: 3.967
IF 5-year
3.967
CiteScore value: 6.6
CiteScore
6.6
SNIP value: 1.262
SNIP1.262
IPP value: 3.90
IPP3.90
SJR value: 2.185
SJR2.185
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 71
Scimago H
index
71
h5-index value: 40
h5-index40
Download
Short summary
Here we study the elemental signatures of plant wax compounds as well as molecules from algae and bacteria to understand how water sources changed over the last 11,000 years in the northeastern part of Europe surrounding the Baltic Sea. Our results show diversity in plant and aquatic microorganisms following the melting of the large ice sheet that covered Northern Europe which caused the regional climate to warm.
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2020-163
https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2020-163

  12 Jan 2021

12 Jan 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal CP.

Co-evolution of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem structure with hydrological change in the Holocene Baltic Sea

Gabriella M. Weiss1,a,b,, Julie Lattaud2,, Marcel T. J. van der Meer1, and Timothy I. Eglinton2 Gabriella M. Weiss et al.
  • 1Department of Marine Microbiology and Biogeochemistry, The Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Texel, The Netherlands
  • 2Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich (ETHZ), Biogeoscience Group, Zurich, Switzerland
  • apresent address: Astrobiology Center for Isotopologue Research, Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA
  • bpresent address: Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA
  • These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract. The Baltic Sea experienced a number of marine transgressions and regressions throughout the Holocene. These fluctuations in sea level coupled with substantial regional ice melt led to isostatic adjustment and periodic isolation from the North Sea. Here, we determine the distributions and isotopic signatures of organic compounds preserved in a sediment record spanning the last ~ 11 ka in order to reconstruct environmental change under these dynamic conditions. Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of short-, mid-, and long-chain n-alkanes along with long-chain diol and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether abundances were analyzed from Arkona Basin sediments sampled from the western Baltic Sea. In the earliest part of the record (10–8.2 ka), hydrogen isotope values of higher plant-derived n-alkanes revealed a change in dominant water source from an ice melt-derived to a precipitation-dominated hydrological regime. Following this shift in water source, carbon isotope values of n-alkanes suggest diversification of vegetation. Shifts in hydrology and vegetation did not coincide with established phase boundaries, but instead occurred mid-phase or spanned phase transitions, highlighting the fact that proxies may record changes on different time scales and suggesting that climate in the region was dynamic throughout the Holocene.

Gabriella M. Weiss et al.

Status: open (until 09 Mar 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Gabriella M. Weiss et al.

Gabriella M. Weiss et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 163 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
127 34 2 163 16 1 0
  • HTML: 127
  • PDF: 34
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 163
  • Supplement: 16
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 12 Jan 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 12 Jan 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 118 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 117 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 24 Jan 2021
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Here we study the elemental signatures of plant wax compounds as well as molecules from algae and bacteria to understand how water sources changed over the last 11,000 years in the northeastern part of Europe surrounding the Baltic Sea. Our results show diversity in plant and aquatic microorganisms following the melting of the large ice sheet that covered Northern Europe which caused the regional climate to warm.
Citation